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5 tips in communicating with employees


Communicating with employeesWhether it is dealing with personnel issues or discussing strategy for a new product launch, a successful business manager must be able to effectively communicate with employees in order for the business to work successfully. Effective communication will reduce the time spent training, will boost employee performance and help to reduce disruptions in the workforce. Here are some tips that managers can use to improve communication with employees.

Speak Clearly

When communicating with employees it is imperative that managers speak clearly.
Obviously the employee must be able to understand what the manager is saying, but clear speech also conveys competence and importance to the employee.
Managers should sit or stand up straight and look at the employee(s) when talking and speak with a strong voice. Managers should avoid mumbling, speaking too fast or too slow and the use of confusing jargon or slang.

Avoid Distractions

Managers should work to limit the presence of distractions when having a conversation with an employee. Moving from behind the desk to a chair at a table or even to a conference room can be an effective way to eliminate distraction and concentrate on the conversation with the employee. When practical, managers and employees should turn off telephones, including cell phones, during both formal and informal business meetings.

Keep it Short

In almost every case, it is better to keep a conversation short and to the point rather than wasting time covering insignificant facts and unrelated information. Employees tend to avoid managers whose every conversation turns into a long and rambling discussion. By keeping conversations short and to the point, a manager can convey or gather the needed information without alienating the employee or keeping the employee away from pressing business matters.

Use Notes

Note taking is an important communication technique for a number of reasons. Taking notes helps the manager to keep track of what has been discussed, it shows the employee that the manager is listening to the conversation and the note taking process can allow the manager and employee time to think about what has been said and what should be said next. This last part can be especially important during stressful conversations about employee discipline and related issues.

Restate the Conversation

When ending a business conversation, a good manager will restate the key information from the conversation. The purpose of this is to make certain that both the manager and the employee clearly understand what was discussed and what action should be taken. If needed, the conversation can be restated through a formal memo or email to provide a written record of the conversation.

Using good communication techniques will not just improve communication between the manager and employees. Managers who use proper communication techniques will, by example, encourage employees to use these techniques with co-workers, supervisors and customers.



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Opened by Antoine Fournier, Head of ECM, Input and Output management, Zurich Insurance
Feb 18, 2013.



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Brian Sheets COO | VP | GM | Strategic Initiatives | Open to new opportunities
Feb 18, 2013

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Antoine: Good points.

You might want to consider expanding your topic to include communications with employees in which important operational information is being disseminated to employees to support a strategic plan by upper management. For example, in this situation, the information communicated should be:
- presented in an interesting fashion to sustain employee attention
- show a “10,00 foot” view of the plan so employees can understand the direction the company is taking
- break down the “10,00 foot” view into operational segments so each department can understand how their contribution will complement other departments in attaining the objective
- break down departmental contributions into sections or the individual contributor role so that each person can see what their role is and how their contribution will contribute toward the common goal.If available, incentive programs can also be discussed so that employees have a “reason” to perform their tasks in a superior manner other than just keeping their job. Contests, incentive payments, days off, ISO awards, employee recognition are all examples of how employees can be progressively engaged to achieve a team-oriented solution. In so doing, some of the same benefits you state in your article will also be recognized, such as reduced training time, boosting employee performance, minimizing disruption, improving coordination of effort (cross-functional teams), and increased company recognition.
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Antoine Fournier 67 Antoine Fournier Head of ECM, Input and Output management, Zurich Insurance

Feb 19, 2013
@Brian : You're definately correct. You go deeper into management recommendations. Those 5 tips are just behaviors to apply at first. What you introduce is a valid and extended approach to management. Thank you for your usefull contribution.

Does it relates to the impressive Saas solution proposed by http://www.10000ft.com/ ?

Roz Bennetts 16 Roz Bennetts B2B Sales, B2B Sales Professional

Feb 20, 2013
Interesting debate as I was just reading something about this from Seth Godin the other day on his blog, except his piece was more about the attitude of the manager than the content.

Here's an excerpt:

"Open, generous and connected Isn't that what we seek from a co-worker, boss, friend or even a fellow conference attendee?
Open to new ideas, leaning forward, exploring the edges, impatient with the status quo... In a hurry to make something worth making.
Generous when given the opportunity (or restless to find the opportunity when not). Focused on giving people dignity, respect and the chance to speak up. Aware that the single most effective way to move forward is to help others move forward as well.
and connected. Part of the community, not apart from it. Hooked into the realities and dreams of the tribe. Able and interested in not only cheering people on, but shining a light on how they can accomplish their goals."


The link to the full blog post, which is actually quite short is here:
http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2013/02/open-generous-and-connected.html

Any thoughts on Seth's view?

Antoine Fournier 67 Antoine Fournier Head of ECM, Input and Output management, Zurich Insurance

Feb 20, 2013
True.
Nevertheless, we should never forgot that the first points to make with employee is to give security and money.
It look obvious, but you should remind that, as a manager, you'll not get those kind of result (open, generous and connected) if your employees are in unsafe situation or frustrated about money.

Security comes from safe position and mentorship.
Aimé jacquet, French football coach, win world up 1998 without French football stars David Ginola and Eric Cantona because he wanted a team more than awesome individuals. He refused to kick out anyone, against pressure from much people. He created a group with players in safe situation, as almost "lifetime" team members.
In addition he made captain a calm, solid and modest player, then created a kernel of old experienced players who behaved as big brothers with young team members.

About money: A lot of studies show that money is NOT an effective motivation - all these studies mentioned that, at first, "money issue should be set out of the table", meaning that people must be paid enough.
Read http://xperlink.com/t-money-still-motivation~147

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Brian Sheets COO | VP | GM | Strategic Initiatives | Open to new opportunities
Feb 19, 2013

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Antoine: No relation to the SaaS reference you mentioned; just some old fashioned, common-sense management that seems to have gottten lost over the years in the quest for the latest and greatest management policy acronym.
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